Sticky Tape Removal Test - tape type

General Details:

Name:
Sticky Tape Removal Test - tape type
Steward:
NINDS
Definition:
Type of the shape of the sticky tape, as part of Sticky Tape Removal Test
Registration Status:
Qualified

Permissible Values:

Value Type:
Value List
Unit of Measure:
Ids:
Value Code Name Code Code System Code Description
1 Circular
2 Rectangular
3 Square

Designations:

Designation:
Sticky Tape Removal Test - tape type
Tags:
Designation:
What is the shape of the tape?
Tags:
Preferred Question Text

Designations:

Definition:
Type of the shape of the sticky tape, as part of Sticky Tape Removal Test
Tags:
Short Description,Definition

Reference Documents:

ID:
Title:
The delayed administration of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate improves recovery of function after traumatic brain injury in rats.
URI:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=14577864
Provider Org:
Language Code:
en-us
Document:
The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEAS), a pro-excitatory neurosteroid, could facilitate recovery of function in male rats after delayed treatment following TBI. DHEAS has been found to play a major role in brain development and aging by influencing the migration of neurons, arborization of dendrites, and formation of new synapses. These characteristics make it suitable as a potential treatment to enhance neural repair in response to CNS injury. In our study, behavioral tests were conducted concurrently with DHEAS administration (0, 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg) starting seven days post-injury (PI). These assays included 10 days of Morris Water Maze testing (MWM; 7d PI), 10 days of Greek-Cross (GC; 21d PI), Tactile Adhesive Removal task (TAR; PI days: 6, 13, 20, 27, 34), and spontaneous motor behavior testing (SMB; PI days: 2, 4, 6, 12, 19, 26, 33). Brain-injured rats showed an improvement in performance in all tasks after 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg DHEAS. The most effective dose of DHEAS in the MWM was 10 mg/kg, while in the GC it was 20 mg/kg, in TAR 5 mg/kg, and all doses, except for vehicle, were effective at reducing injury-induced SMB hyperactivity. In no task did DHEAS-treated animals perform worse than the injured controls. In addition, DHEAS had no significant effects on behavioral performance in the sham-operates. These results can be interpreted to demonstrate that after a 7-day delay, the chronic administration of DHEAS to injured rats significantly improves behavioral recovery on both sensorimotor and cognitive tasks.
ID:
Title:
Lovastatin improves histological and functional outcomes and reduces inflammation after experimental traumatic brain injury.
URI:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=17612572
Provider Org:
Language Code:
en-us
Document:
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) triggers a complex sequence of inflammatory responses that contribute to secondary injury. Statins have demonstrated neuroprotective effects against brain injury, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study evaluated the effects of lovastatin on a rat model of controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. Our two hypotheses were that pre-administration of lovastatin would reduce functional deficits and extent of anatomical brain damage and that lovastatin would attenuate levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Rats were injected with lovastatin (4 mg/kg) or vehicle for 5 days and subjected to CCI. Neurological status was evaluated using rotarod and adhesive removal tests. Contusion volume and neuronal degeneration were examined using cresyl violet and FluoroJade B (FJB) histochemistry. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) mRNA and protein were assessed by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemistry. Lovastatin significantly improved performance on both the rotarod and adhesive removal tests before post-injury day 7. Lovastatin also significantly reduced contusion volume (20%) and number of FJB-positive degenerating neurons (35%) at 4 days. These changes were associated with a significant decrease in levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta mRNA and protein at the contusion site at 6 h and 4 days, respectively. Our results show that pre-administration of lovastatin improved functional outcomes and reduced extent of brain damage, with a concomitant decrease in tissue levels of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta mRNA and protein. These findings suggest that lovastatin's protective mechanisms may be partly attributed to a dampening of the inflammatory response.
ID:
Title:
Treatment with vitamin B3 improves functional recovery and reduces GFAP expression following traumatic brain injury in rats.
URI:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=14651806
Provider Org:
Language Code:
en-us
Document:
Previous studies have shown that administration of vitamin B(3) (B(3)) in animal models of ischemia significantly reduced the size of infarction and improved functional recovery. The present study evaluated the effect of administration of B(3) on recovery of function following traumatic brain injury (TBI), incorporating the bilateral medial frontal cortex contusion injury model. Groups of rats were assigned to B(3) (500 mg/kg) or saline (1.0 ml/kg) treatment conditions and received contusion injuries or sham surgeries. Drug treatment was administered 15 min and 24 h following injury. Rats were examined on a variety of tests to measure sensorimotor performance (bilateral tactile adhesive removal), skilled forelimb use (staircase test), and cognitive ability (reference and working memory) in the Morris Water Maze. Administration of B(3) following injury significantly reduced the behavioral impairments observed on the bilateral tactile removal test, but not on skilled forelimb use. The acquisition of reference and working memory tests were also significantly improved compared to saline-treated rats. Examination of the brains revealed that administration of B(3) significantly reduced the size of the lesion compared to treatment with saline. In addition, examination of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression around the lesion revealed that B(3) significantly reduced the number of GFAP(+) astrocytes. These results indicate that B(3) administration significantly improved behavioral outcome following injury, reduced the size of the lesion, and reduced the expression of GFAP. The current findings suggest that B(3) may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of TBI.
ID:
Title:
Delayed inhibition of Nogo-A does not alter injury-induced axonal sprouting but enhances recovery of cognitive function following experimental traumatic brain injury in rats.
URI:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=15979242
Provider Org:
Language Code:
en-us
Document:
Traumatic brain injury causes long-term neurological motor and cognitive deficits, often with limited recovery. The inability of CNS axons to regenerate following traumatic brain injury may be due, in part, to inhibitory molecules associated with myelin. One of these myelin-associated proteins, Nogo-A, inhibits neurite outgrowth in vitro, and inhibition of Nogo-A in vivo enhances axonal outgrowth and sprouting and improves outcome following experimental CNS insults. However, the involvement of Nogo-A in the neurobehavioral deficits observed in experimental traumatic brain injury remains unknown and was evaluated in the present study using the 11C7 monoclonal antibody against Nogo-A. Anesthetized, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either lateral fluid percussion brain injury of moderate severity (2.5-2.6 atm) or sham injury. Beginning 24 h post-injury, monoclonal antibody 11C7 (n=17 injured, n=6 shams included) or control Ab (IgG) (n=16 injured, n=5 shams included) was infused at a rate of 5 microl/h over 14 days into the ipsilateral ventricle using osmotic minipumps connected to an implanted cannula. Rats were assessed up to 4 weeks post-injury using tests for neurological motor function (composite neuroscore, and sensorimotor test of adhesive paper removal) and, at 4 weeks, cognition was assessed using the Morris water maze. Hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neuron damage and corticospinal tract sprouting, using an anterograde tracer (biotinylated dextran amine), were also evaluated. Brain injury significantly increased sprouting from the uninjured corticospinal tract but treatment with monoclonal antibody 11C7 did not further increase the extent of sprouting nor did it alter the extent of CA3 cell damage. Animals treated with 11C7 showed no improvement in neurologic motor deficits but did show significantly improved cognitive function at 4 weeks post-injury when compared with brain-injured, IgG-treated animals. To our knowledge, the present findings are the first to suggest that (1) traumatic brain injury induces axonal sprouting in the corticospinal tract and this sprouting may be independent of myelin-associated inhibitory factors and (2) that post-traumatic inhibition of Nogo-A may promote cognitive recovery unrelated to sprouting in the corticospinal tract or neuroprotective effects on hippocampal cell loss following experimental traumatic brain injury.
ID:
Title:
A semicircular controlled cortical impact produces long-term motor and cognitive dysfunction that correlates well with damage to both the sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus.
URI:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24905625
Provider Org:
Language Code:
en-us
Document:
Animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are essential for testing novel hypotheses and therapeutic interventions. Unfortunately, due to the broad heterogeneity of TBI in humans, no single model has been able to reproduce the entire spectrum of these injuries. The controlled cortical impact (CCI) model is one of the most commonly used models of contusion TBI. However, behavioral evaluations have revealed transient impairment in motor function after CCI in rats and mice. Here we report a new semicircular CCI (S-CCI) model by increasing the impact tip area to cover both the motor cortex and hippocampal regions in adult mice. Mice were subjected to S-CCI or CCI using an electromagnetic impactor (Impactor One, MyNeuroLab; semicircular tip: 3mm radius; CCI tip diameter: 3mm). We showed that S-CCI, at two injury severities, significantly decreased the neuroscore and produced deficits in performance on a rotarod device for the entire duration of the study. In contrast, the CCI induced motor deficits only at early stages after the injury, suggesting that the S-CCI model produces long-lasting motor deficits. Morris water maze test showed that both CCI and S-CCI produced persisting memory deficits. Furthermore, adhesive removal test showed significant somatosensory and motor deficits only in the S-CCI groups. Histological analysis showed a large extent of cortical contusion lesions, including both the sensory and motor cortex, and hippocampal damage in the S-CCI. These findings collectively suggest that the current model may offer sensitive, reliable, and clinically relevant outcomes for assessments of therapeutic strategies for TBI.
ID:
Title:
Long-Term Motor Deficits after Controlled Cortical Impact in Rats Can Be Detected by Fine Motor Skill Tests but Not by Automated Gait Analysis.
URI:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=27374164
Provider Org:
Language Code:
en-us
Document:
Animal models with constant, long-lasting motor deficits together with the right tests to assess behavioral abnormalities are needed to study the effectiveness of potential therapies to restore motor functions. In the current study, controlled cortical impact (CCI) was applied in rats to induce damage to the forelimb area of the motor cortex and the dorsal striatum. Motor behavior was assessed before and after CCI, using fine motor skill tests such as the adhesive removal test, the cylinder test, and the Montoya staircase test as well as the automated gait analysis system CatWalk XT over a 6 week period. CCI caused a variety of unilateral motor deficits, which were characterized in detail by using the selected fine motor skill tests. In striking contrast to previous studies on CCI in mice, neither forelimb impairments, nor general changes in gait, were detected with the CatWalk XT. These data suggest that the adhesive removal test, the cylinder test, and the Montoya staircase test are the methods of choice to detect long-term unilateral motor deficits in rats after CCI, whereas the use of automated gait analysis systems might not be suitable to measure these behavioral deviations.
ID:
Title:
Microglial activation induced by brain trauma is suppressed by post-injury treatment with a PARP inhibitor.
URI:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=22335939
Provider Org:
Language Code:
en-us
Document:
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces activation of microglia. Activated microglia can in turn increase secondary injury and impair recovery. This innate immune response requires hours to days to become fully manifest, thus providing a clinically relevant window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. Microglial activation is regulated in part by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). Inhibition of PARP-1 activity suppresses NF-kB-dependent gene transcription and thereby blocks several aspects of microglial activation. Here we evaluated the efficacy of a PARP inhibitor, INO-1001, in suppressing microglial activation after cortical impact in the rat.Rats were subjected to controlled cortical impact and subsequently treated with 10 mg/kg of INO-1001 (or vehicle alone) beginning 20 - 24 hours after the TBI. Brains were harvested at several time points for histological evaluation of inflammation and neuronal survival, using markers for microglial activation (morphology and CD11b expression), astrocyte activation (GFAP), and neuronal survival (NeuN). Rats were also evaluated at 8 weeks after TBI using measures of forelimb dexterity: the sticky tape test, cylinder test, and vermicelli test.Peak microglial and astrocyte activation was observed 5 to 7 days after this injury. INO-1001 significantly reduced microglial activation in the peri-lesion cortex and ipsilateral hippocampus. No rebound inflammation was observed in rats that were treated with INO-1001 or vehicle for 12 days followed by 4 days without drug. The reduced inflammation was associated with increased neuronal survival in the peri-lesion cortex and improved performance on tests of forelimb dexterity conducted 8 weeks after TBI.Treatment with a PARP inhibitor for 12 days after TBI, with the first dose given as long as 20 hours after injury, can reduce inflammation and improve histological and functional outcomes.
ID:
Title:
Post-traumatic hypoxia exacerbates neurological deficit, neuroinflammation and cerebral metabolism in rats with diffuse traumatic brain injury.
URI:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=22034986
Provider Org:
Language Code:
en-us
Document:
The combination of diffuse brain injury with a hypoxic insult is associated with poor outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury. In this study, we investigated the impact of post-traumatic hypoxia in amplifying secondary brain damage using a rat model of diffuse traumatic axonal injury (TAI). Rats were examined for behavioral and sensorimotor deficits, increased brain production of inflammatory cytokines, formation of cerebral edema, changes in brain metabolism and enlargement of the lateral ventricles.Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to diffuse TAI using the Marmarou impact-acceleration model. Subsequently, rats underwent a 30-minute period of hypoxic (12% O2/88% N2) or normoxic (22% O2/78% N2) ventilation. Hypoxia-only and sham surgery groups (without TAI) received 30 minutes of hypoxic or normoxic ventilation, respectively. The parameters examined included: 1) behavioural and sensorimotor deficit using the Rotarod, beam walk and adhesive tape removal tests, and voluntary open field exploration behavior; 2) formation of cerebral edema by the wet-dry tissue weight ratio method; 3) enlargement of the lateral ventricles; 4) production of inflammatory cytokines; and 5) real-time brain metabolite changes as assessed by microdialysis technique.TAI rats showed significant deficits in sensorimotor function, and developed substantial edema and ventricular enlargement when compared to shams. The additional hypoxic insult significantly exacerbated behavioural deficits and the cortical production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β and TNF but did not further enhance edema. TAI and particularly TAI+Hx rats experienced a substantial metabolic depression with respect to glucose, lactate, and glutamate levels.Altogether, aggravated behavioural deficits observed in rats with diffuse TAI combined with hypoxia may be induced by enhanced neuroinflammation, and a prolonged period of metabolic dysfunction.
ID:
Title:
Treatment with vitamin B3 improves functional recovery and reduces GFAP expression following traumatic brain injury in rats.
URI:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=14651806
Provider Org:
Language Code:
en-us
Document:

Properties:

Key:
Keywords
Value:
Preclinical; StickyTapeTest
Key:
Guidelines/Instructions
Value:
Record the shape of the sticky tape label. Choose one.

Identifiers:

Source:
NLM
Id:
m1kncofoV
Version:
1.0
Source:
BRICS Variable Name
Id:
STRTestTapeTyp
Version: